lazyking-eleena:

fahrlight:

slightly-bovverd:

thecakebar:

Look at these mousse like cheesecakes(?) with stuffed centers! :O

The first one looks like a berries cheesecake, then Tiramisu cheesecake, strawberry shortcake, and I’m not sure about the last! (click the link for more pics)

*UPDATE:

Cheesecake coffins!

PORN!

Pron.

(via elliepanda319)

iwasbornunderawanderingstar:

friedcheesemogu:

ktopless:

a—psychedelic—mess:

these are beautiful, but why would you ever do this to a book?

^this

Okay this is something I have to answer because as a bookseller, as a bookseller working in a used bookstore, this is something I have to deal with daily. People get mad at me or express something like profound disappointment when I indicate that we recycle what we can’t use, and some of that recycling is the employees using books to make art and/or crafts like purses, buttons, collages, jewelry, etc.

You know why we do it? Because we love books. We recycle them so they can be made into new books by a company that we pay to do exactly that. We make them into art because sometimes there is nothing else you can do with them and the thought of just getting rid of them seems like a waste.

You may love books and hate to see them “destroyed,” but tell me what you, personally, are going to do with a full set of Encyclopedia Britannica from 1994? That’s 26 books of outdated information. When you have a stack of Twilight books that is literally two feet tall, is it really absolutely necessary to preserve the integrity of their bookiness? Or might it be more worthwhile to give them a second life? As a new book, as art, as something other than an object that takes up space in a store where we need as much as possible to sell the books you love and that we love too. I wouldn’t do this to, say, the Gutenberg Bible or a first edition Virginia Woolf, but something we see several times a day every day? Art is a pretty good fate for an otherwise unsaleable book.

No one is asking you to make incredible mountain ranges out of the books you love. But please consider that same love might have something to do with why people make the things they do out of books.

Reblogged for commentary. 

(Source: iamthecollage, via jigster)

thecakebar:

36 Homemade Popsicle Recipes By Artsy Mama

1. Rainbow Pudding Pops by Sandy Toes and Popsicles
2. Raspberry Limeade Ice Pops
 by Poofy Cheeks
3. Orange Julius Popsicles
 by A Night Owl
4. Banana Split on a Stick
 by Damy Health
5. Mango Popsicles
 by Katy She Cooks
6. Root Beer Float Pops
 by Erin Cooks
7. Pineapple Coconut Cilantro Popsicles
 by Keep Your Diet Real
8. Blackberry and Lime Popsicles
 by Baked Bree
9. Chocolate and Salted Caramel Pudding Pops
 by Endless Simmer
10. Lemonade Stand Popsicles by Somewhere Splendid
11. Cereal and Milk Popsicles by The Little Foodie
12. Pomegranate Yogurt Pops by The Kitchn
13. Easy, Creamy, Lemon Dream Popsicles by Whipped
14. Fresh Fruit Popsicles by PopSugar
15. Peanut Butter Oreo Popsicles by Pass the Sushi

16. Berry Yogurt Popsicles by SkinnyTaste
17. Peaches and Cream Popsicles by My Baking Addiction
18. Frozen Smoothie Pops
 by Culinary
19. Boston Cream Pie Popsicles by Something Swanky
20. Homemade Frozen Jello Pops
 by For the Love of Food
21. Chocolate Covered Strawberry Popsicles
 by Chocolate & Carrots
22. Sunshine Pops
 by Martha Stewart
23. Chocolate Kiwi Popsicles
 by ShowFood Chef
24. Lemonade & Strawberry Cheesecake Popsicles
 by Eat Good 4 Life
25. Honeydew Popsicles by Pass the Sushi
26. Watermelon Pops by Kraft
27. Chocolate Covered Peanut Butter Popsicles by All Day I Dream About Food
28. Cookies and Cream Popsicles by Just Baked
29. Nutella Fudgesicles by Daily Waffle
30. Mango Orange Yogurt Popsicles by 6 Bittersweets
31. Strawberry Shortcake Popsicles by Bakers Royale
32. Chocolate Cheesecake Ice Pops by Babble
33. Piña Colada Popsicles
 by Becoming Bettty
34. Double Rainbow Quick Pops
 by Zoku
35. Ice Pops
 by Bakerella
36. Samoa Popsicles
 My Baking Addiction

(via thecakebar)